The following individuals, Nancy Carlsson-Paige, Shanta Driver, Deborah Meier, Jonathan Kozol, and Rose Sanders, support the Save Our Schools Movement. Each will speak at our People’s Principles Convention in August 2012. We thank our speakers and you. Your actions and advocacy will do much to Preserve and Transform Quality Public Education for All.

Shanta Driver

Shanta Driver
Saturday, August 4, 2012. 8:30 – 9:30 AM
Keynote Address; [followed by a Civil Rights Panel] “Building the New Civil Rights Movement: Why We Need Direct Action to Defend Public Education”

A graduate of Harvard University, Shanta Driver is the National Director of United for Equality and Affirmative Action (UEAA). UEAA organized and directed the student intervention into Grutter v. Bollinger, the Supreme Court-bound, landmark affirmative action case involving the University of Michigan Law School. In the trial of Grutter, UEAA presented the broadest and deepest defense of affirmative action ever made in a court of law, exposing the separate and unequal quality of K-12 education, the bias inherent in the standardized tests, the effects of hostile racial climate on the academic performance of minority students, the failure of all attempted alternatives to affirmative action and the current impact and significance of race and racism in American society.

Ms. Driver also serves as the National Coordinator of the Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action and Integration, and Fight for Equality By Any Means Necessary (BAMN), a named defendant in UEAA’s student intervention. BAMN is the leading national civil rights organization fighting in defense of affirmative action and integration.

Nancy Carlsson-Paige

Nancy Carlsson-Paige
Friday, August 3, 2012. 7:30 – 9:00 PM
Keynote Address; “Early Childhood Teachers say No! to Early Academics and Testing”

Nancy Carlsson-Paige is a professor of early childhood education at Lesley University where she has taught teachers for more than 30 years. Professor Carlsson-Paige was a founder of the University’s Center for Peaceable Schools. Since the mid-1980’s, Nancy has written and spoken extensively about the impact of violence, especially in the media, on children’s lives and social development, and how children learn the skills for caring relationships and positive conflict resolution. She has written five books and numerous articles on media violence, conflict resolution, and peaceable classrooms and schools. Her most recent book is called Taking Back Childhood: A Proven Roadmap for Raising Confident, Creative, Compassionate Kids. Nancy is an advocate for policies and practices that promote children’s well being and encourage skills and attitudes that further peace and nonviolence.

Jonathan Kozol

Jonathan Kozol
Saturday, August 4, 2012. 7:00 – 8:00 PM
Open to the public!

Keynote Address; “Fire In The Ashes: Victims and Survivors, Kids and Teachers in Public Schools Under Siege — How Do We Fight Back?”

Jonathan Kozol – Educator, Writer, Activist
“If you grow up in the South Bronx today or in south-central Los Angeles or Pittsburgh or Philadelphia, you quickly come to understand that you have been set apart and that there’s no will in this society to bring you back into the mainstream. The kids have eyes and they can see, and they have ears and they can hear. Kids notice that no politicians talk about this. Nobody says we’re going to make them less separate and more equal. Nobody says that.”

In 1964 Jonathan Kozol left his comfortable surroundings in Cambridge, Massachusetts to begin work as a teacher in low-income, predominately black Roxbury, first in a freedom school and later in a public elementary school. He grew up in Newton, was educated at Harvard and a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford.

His first published nonfiction, Death at an Early Age: The Destruction of the Hearts and Minds of Negro Children in the Boston Public Schools (1967) winner of the National Book Award, drew upon his experiences as a fourth-grade teacher. The practice of immersing himself in the lives of his subjects became the pattern for his subsequent searing studies of the injustices a wealthy society visits upon its most vulnerable members.

Deborah Meier – New York

Deborah Meier – New York
Saturday, August 4, 2012. 4:30 – 5:15 PM
Keynote Address; “Democracy and Education”

Deborah Meier is a senior scholar at NYU’s Steinhardt School, and Board member of the Coalition of Essential Schools, FairTest, SOS, Dissent and The Nation magazines. She spent 45 years working in K-12th grade public schools in New York City (East Harlem) and Boston (Roxbury) including leadership of several highly successful small democratically run urban schools–the Central Park East schools and Mission Hill. Her books include The Power of Their Ideas and In Schools We Trust. In 1987 she was the first educator to receive a McArthur “genius” Award and currently blogs for Ed Week with Diane Ravitch (Bridging Differences.)

Rose Sanders

Rose Sanders
Sunday, August 5, 2012. 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Keynote Address; The Uprising: United People Reclaiming Our Intellect and Nurturing Generations

Ora Rose Touré is a Harvard-educated Civil Rights activist and litigation attorney who has worked on some of the highest-profile civil rights cases to come before the courts. Touré was the first African-American female judge in Alabama and was part of the winning legal team in Pigford v s. Veneman, the largest civil rights case in history that led to the payment of a billion dollars in damages to black farmers by the U. S. Department of Agriculture. In addition, Touré is founder of the National Voting Rights Museum in Selma, Alabama, and a founding partner in the law firm of Chestnut, Sanders, Sanders, Pettaway & Campbell, LLC. She is president and co-founder of the 21st Century Leadership project for youth across the South. Intensely passionate about her activism and legal work and the needs of the black community, Touré has founded learning and cultural centers, political and legal organizations, and community initiatives that have benefited Alabamians for three decades

SAVE OUR SCHOOLS